Sector Articles / Reports / Resources

In regions throughout the US, foundations and philanthropic groups convene panels, conduct webinars and interviews, create press releases, and develop various multi-media products to showcase the impact of philanthropic investment in Black communities. In this section, ABFE has compiled a growing list of these products to document the evolution of Black male initiatives in philanthropy and to highlight data of particular interest to members and colleagues throughout its networks.
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Seeking to Soar: Foundation Funding for Asian American & Pacific Islander Communities

March 1, 2021

This report, Seeking to Soar: Foundation Funding for Asian American & Pacific Islander Communities, probes the question of foundation investments in AAPI communities. In these pages, AAPIP provides a brief overview of philanthropic support for AAPI communities over the past 35 years, 10 years, and an even closer look at the last five years of currently available data. The major findings are a shocking disappointment — the percentage of foundation dollars designated for AAPI communities has not moved over the past three decades.This report is being released amidst an ongoing pandemic that unleashed anti-Asian hate and violence readily simmering just below the surface; a long overdue reckoning with systemic racism; a global economic crisis; and a tumultuous period of partisanship that is testing the strength of this country's multiracial democracy.

The 2018 Diversity Among Philanthropic Professionals Report

November 21, 2019

In 2018, Funders for LGBTQ Issues set out to survey the board and staff of foundations in order to identify how many LGBTQ people worked in philanthropy — which resulted in The Philanthropic Closet: LGBTQ People in Philanthropy.In designing the survey, we realized that we had an opportunity to not only ask about sexual orientation and gender identity but also to inquire about a range of personal identifiers. With the inaugural Diversity Among Philanthropic Professionals (DAPP) Survey, we asked participants to identify their role within their foundation, their age, gender identity, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, and disability status. This report lays out the results of the DAPP survey in aggregate form.Produced in partnership with CHANGE Philanthropy and Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy (EPIP), the report and accompanying infographic explore diversity in the philanthropic workforce. Overall, the report finds a statistically significant difference between funders with a social justice focus and all other funders. Social justice funders were much more likely to have higher representation of LGBTQ people, people of color, and people with disabilities.The report finds:People of color accounted for 37.8 percent of people on the staff or board of participating foundations.However, the percentage varied depending on a foundation's focus. People of color made up 45.6 percent of the staff and board at foundations with a social justice focus, while they accounted for 33.0 percent of staff and board at foundations with another focus.While women accounted for nearly 70 percent of the staff and board at all participating foundations, only 44 percent of board members were women.Nearly half of women at foundations with a social justice focus were women of color; only a third of women at foundations with another focus were women of color.Among lesbian, gay, and bisexual people in philanthropy, 43.1 percent of those at foundations with a social justice focus were people of color, compared to one-third of those at foundations with another focus.Among transgender people, 57.1 percent of transgender people at foundations with a social justice focus were people of color, while 25 percent of transgender people at foundations with another focus were people of color.At foundations with a social justice focus, people with disabilities made up 8.8 percent of staff and boards, compared to 4.8 percent at foundations with another focus.Across all participating foundations, 10.3 percent of staff and board were born outside of the United States.

Foundation Funding for U.S. Trans Communities

July 26, 2018

Produced as a part of Funder's for LGBTQ Issues' Grantmakers United for Trans Communities (GUTC) Initiative, this infographic highlights the needs of the more than 1 million trans people in the United States and notes the current scale and scope of funding for trans issues.Transgender Americans face alarmingly high rates of poverty and homelessness, struggle with considerable health disparities, and constantly confront ill-informed stigma. While funding for transgender communities in the United States has increased four-fold in the last five years, as of 2016, it still totals less than $17 million a year. As a result for every $100 awarded by US foundations, only 3 cents benefits trans communities.

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