Sector Articles / Reports / Resources

In regions throughout the US, foundations and philanthropic groups convene panels, conduct webinars and interviews, create press releases, and develop various multi-media products to showcase the impact of philanthropic investment in Black communities. In this section, ABFE has compiled a growing list of these products to document the evolution of Black male initiatives in philanthropy and to highlight data of particular interest to members and colleagues throughout its networks.
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A Spirit of Unity: How Black Foundation CEOs are Advancing the Call to Action on Anti-Black Racism for Philanthropy

December 1, 2022

In 2020, ABFE issue a challenge to philanthropy to let the passion of the racial uprisings and protests inspire them to generate bold and effective ways to uplift the Black community. For over two years, ABFE has regularly convened Black foundation CEOs in the U.S., including Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, to craft a set of imperatives that address anti-Black racism.This report centers the work of Black Foundation CEOs and is a self-reported indication of the forward movement these leaders are making towards building a healthier, more robust, and better resourced Black community. Our long-term goal is to free Black people from disparate treatment that result in the racial disparities on almost every indicator of well-being. To get there, we must dismantle the structures and institutional policies and practices that disadvantage and marginalize Black people, as well as the false narratives about Black communities that allow for continued inhumane treatment.

A Year of Learning: Educating the Philanthropic Community About Racialized and Stigmatized Nonprofits

October 1, 2022

The Muslim nonprofit sector is diverse and young, with many organizations established in the post-9/11 era. The Muslim nonprofit sector has been under scrutiny and faces discrimination in the form of Islamophobia. The racialized and stigmatized identity of Muslims has further increased the disconnect between the Muslim nonprofit sector and the philanthropic community. This report paper examines the work of the Year of Learning and its attempts to educate philanthropic leaders about the importance of engaging with racialized minorities including US Muslims. It raised the following questions: Why is there a lack of interaction between the racialized nonprofit sector and the foundation world? What are the challenges? This research suggests that the most powerful way to overcome these challenges is by engaging and educating both sides.

Behind the Counter: Findings from the 2022 Oral Contraceptives Access Survey

September 26, 2022

Over the Summer of 2022, Advocates for Youth surveyed 243 people from 43 different states about their experiences trying to access birth control pills as young people and young adults. The findings paint a concerning picture that we believe every policymaker should read.For the 55% of respondents who couldn't get on birth control due to the constraints of the current prescription-only system, one in five experienced an unintended pregnancy. Many more suffered unnecessary stress, lost wages, and more.It is time the United States join more than 100 countries around the world and bring The Pill over-the-counter and onto the shelves for all ages, covered by insurance. 

Nowhere to Go: Maternity Care Deserts Across the U.S.

September 25, 2022

Consistent, high-quality maternity care is essential to protect the health of all moms and babies. Maternity care encompasses health care services for women during pregnancy, delivery and postpartum. With over 3.5 million births in the U.S. annually, and rising rates of maternal mortality and morbidity, there is ample opportunity to improve maternal and birth outcomes in our country. The 2022 Nowhere to Go: Maternity Care Deserts Across the U.S. report is an update of the 2020 report and aims to increase education and raise awareness about maternity care deserts. Along with data and maternity care deserts classification updates, new topics touching on the postpartum period, the importance of telehealth and the intersection of chronic disease and pregnancy are included.

Mobilizing Money and Movements: Creative finance for food systems transformation

May 24, 2022

The report Mobilizing Money and Movements: Creative finance for food systems transformation provides investors with a roadmap of creative finance strategies that support entrepreneurs, farmers, activists, and social movements to transform local food economies. Conducted by the Global Alliance for the Future of Food and Transformational Investing in Food Systems Initiative (TIFS), this report showcases six food-focused initiatives that have incorporated unique investment strategies that blend a spectrum of financial capital to both stimulate social enterprise and achieve sustainable, equitable, and secure food systems.

Reglas e incentivos: mapeo del marco legal para las organizaciones sin fines de lucro y la filantropía en América Latina y el Caribe

April 19, 2022

 Durante los últimos dos años, WINGS, el Centro de Filantropía e Inversiones Sociales de la Escuela de Gobierno de la Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (CEFIS UAI) y the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy of Indiana University, hemos trabajado en forma mancomunada para hacer posible una lectura amplia sobre los asuntos claves de la regulación del ciclo de vida de las entidades sin fines de lucro y de las normas para donaciones a asuntos de interés público. En el presente estudio se mapearon y analizaron los marcos legales y fiscales de 19 países que fijan las reglas para que la filantropía y las organizaciones sin fines de lucro puedan operar en América Latina y el Caribe.

Rules and Incentives: Mapping the Legal Framework for Non-profit Organisations and Philanthropy in Latin America and the Caribbean

April 19, 2022

For the past two years, WINGS, the Centro de Filantropía e Inversiones Sociales de la Escuela de Gobierno de la Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (CEFIS UAI) and the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy of Indiana University, have worked together to develop a comparative study on the legal frameworks in Latin America and the Caribbean that regulate donations and the life cycle of non-profit organisations.  In this report, you will find detailed information from 19 countries that reveals what regulations hinder and which ones help philanthropy in the region.

Can You Verify? Addressing Work Authorization Restrictions As Obstacles to Workforce Development Equity for Immigrant Workers

March 9, 2022

This year, the Governor proposed over $250 million in funding for workforce development specifically intended to benefit immigrant communities. These investments include job training, support services, "earn and learn" opportunities, and more—promising, welcome, and necessary funding for our communities to gain better jobs in the workforce. But what does our current public workforce development system look like, especially for undocumented immigrant workers? Our latest research on workforce development, building off of our prior work, investigates how work authorization requirements may create unnecessary barriers for California's undocumented immigrant workforce when attempting to access public workforce services and resources. This report is the first-ever empirical analysis of the discrepancies in local workforce boards' policies and practices related to immigrant access to workforce development services. It offers new insights through original survey data collected from California's 45 local workforce development boards, COVID-19 and industry data on immigrant workers, and strategic recommendations that the California Workforce Development Board can implement to better support undocumented immigrant workers and remove exclusionary, and unneccesary, restrictions. 

The Color of Justice: Transitional Justice and the Legacy of Slavery and Racism in the United States

April 26, 2021

This briefing paper examines how transitional justice approaches can guide the discussion around dismantling systemic racism in the United States to focus on root causes of violence and racial injustice. Drawing from relevant experiences internationally and within the United States, it provides ideas for what steps can be taken to advance acknowledgment, redress harms linked to the legacy of slavery, reform institutions, and prevent future recurrences.

We are the Prey: Racial Profiling and Policing of Youth in New Bedford

April 1, 2021

The New Bedford Police Department reports incidents involving young people of color at disproportionate rates that are shocking in a white majority city. Additionally, there are patterns of over-policing lower-income neighborhoods, both formally and informally, as police officers are encouraged to live in public housing by rents that are discounted far below that of other residents and communities of color bearing the brunt of frequent stops and interrogations by the NBPD.The NBPD maintains a database of residents it alleges are gang affiliated, the majority of whom are young men of color. Though criteria are subjective, inclusion on the database is used as a pretext to violate the rights of listed people and, they report, their families as well. A handful of officers account for almost half of the incidents involving Black and Latinx residents. Like most departments, NBPD operates on a seniority system that makes it difficult for younger recruits to object to biased behavior – even against themselves when they are people of color.Citizens for Juvenile Justice (CfJJ) obtained the information in this report through police department data, interviews with stakeholders in New Bedford, and media accounts. 

Protest During Pandemic: D.C. Police Kettling of Racial Justice Demonstrators

March 10, 2021

This report, "Protest During Pandemic: D.C. Police Kettling of Racial Justice Demonstrators on Swann Street," is a collaboration of the ACLU of the District of Columbia, Washington Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs, and Sidley Austin LLP.On the evening of June 1, 2020, the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) deployed significant force in and around Swann Street, a narrow residential street in Northwest D.C. to detain more than 200 people who had been protesting police brutality and excessive force in the wake of George Floyd's murder. These protesters were arrested on a single, common charge — violation of the Mayor's 7:00 p.m. curfew. Protesters were penned together in single residential city block and transported around the city for processing and arrest in vehicles that didn't allow for social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, putting their health and lives at unnecessary risk.The report is based on interviews with more than 50 individual eyewitnesses, including protestors who were kettled and Swann Street residents who witnessed the events from their homes. In addition, we reviewed photos and video footage taken during the June 1 events, as well as other evidence available from the existing public record. Based on this review, we have identified multiple serious questions raised by MPD's actions that night. The report also provides recommendations to the D.C. Council for police response to First Amendment assemblies.

Journey Toward Racial Equity: Baseline Findings from the Racial Equity Capacity Assessment

March 1, 2021

This report represents the latest in an effort by Philanthropy-Serving Organizations (PSOs) to advance philanthropic practice and impact by centering racial equity. Written by some members of United Philanthropy Forum's Racial Equity Committee together with Community Centered Evaluation & Research, the report is based on findings of the Forum's inaugural Racial Equity Capacity Assessment for PSOs. Nearly three-quarters of Forum members completed the assessment, which provides a baseline to examine PSOs' internal efforts and external programming in advancing racial equity. The Forum also completed the assessment, and is using the results to inform the Forum's internal racial equity work.

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