Sector Articles / Reports / Resources

In regions throughout the US, foundations and philanthropic groups convene panels, conduct webinars and interviews, create press releases, and develop various multi-media products to showcase the impact of philanthropic investment in Black communities. In this section, ABFE has compiled a growing list of these products to document the evolution of Black male initiatives in philanthropy and to highlight data of particular interest to members and colleagues throughout its networks.
Clear all

213 results found

reorder grid_view

The Heart Work of Hard Work: Black Teacher Pipeline Best Practices at HBCU Teacher Education Programs

February 8, 2024

This report by the UNCF Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute examines the best practices implemented at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) teacher preparation programs, which result in these institutions being significant producers of Black teachers for America's public education system.This report builds on the HBCU teacher preparation program scholarship by providing a snapshot of the recruitment, curricular, and co-curricular practices implemented at these institutions to strengthen the Black teacher pipeline. Through the voices of faculty, staff, and students at four HBCU teacher preparation programs, this report will introduce practices that support their Black pre-service teachers.

When Communities Keep Flooding: A Rural Environmental Justice Case Study

December 7, 2023

We all want to live in places that are safe and able to respond to disasters. But right now, many rural communities and Native nations — especially communities of color and low-wealth places — experience repeated devastating flooding.Repeated flooding is an environmental justice issue for both urban and rural communities, but rural communities need rural solutions when confronting natural disasters and associated recovery efforts, as detailed in our call to action, Through Natural Disaster to Prosperity.The drivers of repeated flooding in rural communities are complex, including climate, unsustainable approaches to development, and structural inequity. Still, rural people across the country are working diligently and creatively on home-grown solutions.The communities and organizations profiled in this case study are all working hard to address the causes and conditions contributing to flooding in their areas, as well as to envision and build thriving futures of equitable rural prosperity.They generously shared their thoughts, focusing on two key questions:What structural challenges keep rural communities from addressing repeated flooding?What will it take for rural communities to drive their own solutions to repeated flooding?

Exclusionary by Design: An Investigation of Zoning’s Use as a Tool of Race, Class, and Family Exclusion in Boston’s Suburbs, 1920 to Today

November 8, 2023

Based on extensive review of local planning documents, state reports, and press coverage over the past 100 years, this report finds widespread use of zoning as a tool of social exclusion against residents of color, especially Black residents; lower-income and working-class residents; families with school-aged children; religious minorities; immigrants; and, in some cases, any newcomers/outsiders at all.

Philanthropy’s Role in Reparations and Building a Culture of Racial Repair

September 27, 2023

Many in philanthropy have expressed a desire to advance racial equity and a thriving multiracial democracy. This article, written in collaboration with Liberation Ventures, invites philanthropists, foundations, and other funders to see reparations for Black people—and building a culture of repair—as a necessity to reach that goal.

The Power to Win: Black, Latiné, and Working Class Community Organizing on the Climate Crisis

March 20, 2023

After decades of warnings from scientists and activists, the climate crisis is no longer a prognosis of what is to come, it is the definitive reality of our world. In the last 50 years, global carbon emissions have risen by 90%, and this past April marked the highest recorded levels of CO2 in human history.Our use of fossil fuels is costing us our lives. Each year, we are experiencing the rapidly increasing effects of this industry-caused crisis: intense droughts and heatwaves, stronger and more frequent hurricanes, increased flooding from risingseas, blazing wildfires, and more.While corporations and the wealthy are responsible for the continued production of the carbon emissions that drive climate change, Black, Indigenous, Latiné, low-income communities, and the global south —the people who have the lowest carbon footprint—are the most impacted by the devastating impacts of the climate crisis. Black people, in particular, are 75% more likely than white people to reside near incinerators, coal power stations, or in low-lying areas at risk of flooding.Because of historic environmental racism, disinvestment, poor infrastructure, and lack of resources, these communities are far less equipped to prepare for and recover from climate disasters, placing them at far greater risk of the multitude of traumas that climate disasters unleash. Accordingly, these communities are also on the frontlines of the very work needed to transform the crisis. As the largest network of grassroots organizations in the US, the Center for Popular Democracy (CPD) and our 48 affiliates play a vital role in building the power necessary to tackle the climate crisis. CPD's affiliate organizations are based in the very Black, Latiné, and low-income communities that are most disproportionately impacted by the climate crisis. For nearly a decade, the community organizations of the CPD network have fought for and won significant change at the federal, state, and local levels—all while being significantly under-resourced for this work.

Financial Health Pulse 2022 Chicago Report

January 31, 2023

Chicago is known as one of the most segregated cities in America, with pockets of both deep wealth and extreme vulnerability. Even compared with the country as a whole, the city's legacy of race-based discrimination and decades of disinvestment and marginalization is extreme. Today, that legacy manifests in starkly different financial opportunities and realities for its citizens, falling largely along racial and ethnic lines. In partnership with The Chicago Community Trust, we examine the factors that contribute to financial health disparities among Chicagoans and residents of surrounding Cook County.Key TakeawaysCook County, including Chicago, demonstrates both greater financial health and greater financial vulnerability than the U.S. as a whole.The disparities in financial health across race and ethnicity are dramatically larger in Cook County than in the U.S.Black and Latinx households in Cook County are far less likely than white households to have access to wealth-building assets, yet are more likely to hold most kinds of debt than white households.Black and Latinx people in Cook County are far more likely to be Financially Vulnerable than their counterparts nationwide.Racial gaps in financial health of Cook County residents can't be explained by household income alone.

Centering Racial Justice to strengthen the Public Health Ecosystem

December 15, 2022

The public health field experienced a collective "moment" in 2020, declaring racism a public health crisis in cities, counties, and states across the country. However, since then, too many have slipped back to "business as usual." The new report Centering Racial Justice to Strengthen the Public Health Ecosystem: Lessons from COVID-19 from Prevention Institute and Big Cities Health Coalition calls on us all to reignite our collective commitment to bold transformational change rooted in equity and racial justice.

Generation Spark: Igniting, Supporting, and Propelling Girls of Color

December 15, 2022

In 2020, the Ms. Foundation for Women released the groundbreaking report, Pocket Change: How Women and Girls of Color Do More with Less, which provided a baseline understanding of philanthropic funding and investment in women and girls of color (WGOC) throughout the U.S and its territories. The report found that total philanthropic giving to WGOC averages out to just $5.48 per year for each woman or girl of color in the United States.Since then, the Foundation has continued its strategic approach to invest in WGOC through its grantmaking initiatives, including the national Girls of Color Initiative, which provides funding, leadership development and capacity building resources to support the advocacy and movement building of adolescent girls of color – centering their advocacy needs.Girls of color don't just want to see change in their communities around these issues, they want to create it. The Girls of Color Initiative hopes to shift power back to girls of color to do just that.With new research, surveys, and focus group participation, this appendix takes a closer look at the national landscape of programs and organizations in the U.S. Based on their experience, it directly shares from WGOC what is needed from the philanthropy community to best support girls of color and transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) youth of color in their advocacy efforts.

A Spirit of Unity: How Black Foundation CEOs are Advancing the Call to Action on Anti-Black Racism for Philanthropy

December 1, 2022

In 2020, ABFE issue a challenge to philanthropy to let the passion of the racial uprisings and protests inspire them to generate bold and effective ways to uplift the Black community. For over two years, ABFE has regularly convened Black foundation CEOs in the U.S., including Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, to craft a set of imperatives that address anti-Black racism.This report centers the work of Black Foundation CEOs and is a self-reported indication of the forward movement these leaders are making towards building a healthier, more robust, and better resourced Black community. Our long-term goal is to free Black people from disparate treatment that result in the racial disparities on almost every indicator of well-being. To get there, we must dismantle the structures and institutional policies and practices that disadvantage and marginalize Black people, as well as the false narratives about Black communities that allow for continued inhumane treatment.

Racial Equity – Informed Philanthropy: A Funder Resource from A Jewish Perspective

November 23, 2022

In 2022, Slingshot partnered with the Jews of Color Initiative to create "Racial Equity Informed Philanthropy: A Funder Resource from A Jewish Perspective". Our hope is for this resource to spark critical conversations and transformative change at the intersection of philanthropy, racial equity, and Jewish values. As we strive to advance the field of Jewish philanthropy as a whole, this new resource can begin to equip funders with the tools they need to integrate a racial equity-based analysis into their philanthropic practice.

A Year of Learning: Educating the Philanthropic Community About Racialized and Stigmatized Nonprofits

October 1, 2022

The Muslim nonprofit sector is diverse and young, with many organizations established in the post-9/11 era. The Muslim nonprofit sector has been under scrutiny and faces discrimination in the form of Islamophobia. The racialized and stigmatized identity of Muslims has further increased the disconnect between the Muslim nonprofit sector and the philanthropic community. This report paper examines the work of the Year of Learning and its attempts to educate philanthropic leaders about the importance of engaging with racialized minorities including US Muslims. It raised the following questions: Why is there a lack of interaction between the racialized nonprofit sector and the foundation world? What are the challenges? This research suggests that the most powerful way to overcome these challenges is by engaging and educating both sides.

Advancing Racial Equity through Federally Funded Public Transit, Bicycle, and Pedestrian Projects: A Data Guide for Local Applicants

September 22, 2022

Improving the quality and reliability of public transit and expanding access to nonmotorized modes of transportation, such as walking and cycling, are key to making progress on the Biden administration's goals of advancing racial equity and tackling the climate crisis, both of which are outlined in executive orders issued by President Biden in his first month in office.Federal agencies have since incorporated these priorities into many grant programs, including those funded by the $1.2 trillion Infrastructure and Investment Jobs Act, which provides funding for a range of projects across transportation, energy, water, broadband, and more. Many competitive federal grant programs are now incorporating selection criteria requiring applicants to address the equity implications of their proposed projects and to demonstrate how proposed projects will benefit "disadvantaged" communities.Yet many applicants struggle to quantify racial equity and environmental justice and face obstacles in accessing and analyzing the data necessary to do so. In response to this need, Urban researchers have assembled nearly 100 data sources and tools that can help applicants for federal funding make equity-driven decisions about which projects to pursue and help them develop successful, evidence-informed grant applications. Our transportation data guide categorizes these data sources and tools into six relevant categories and demonstrates how these data can be used to address key funding priorities across several competitive IIJA transportation grant programs. The data sources and tools are displayed in the embedded table below. For each entry, we collected key attributes including available indicators, geographic coverage, time span, periodicity, and accessibility. Definitions of these attributes can be viewed by hovering over the column headers in the table.This guide is intended for local governments or organizations interested in advancing racial equity through the pursuit of federally funded public transit, bicycle, and pedestrian projects. It aims to give local leaders the tools to assess the equity motivations and impacts, both positive and negative, of potential projects. We hope it will empower localities to make evidence-informed decisions that simultaneously advance racial equity and climate action.

Showing 12 of 213 results

arrow_upward